here's a collection of

PUMPKIN PIE SPICE RECIPES

fall for your food

It's hard not to want to enjoy pumpkin pie spice year round; the aroma and taste are so strongly associated with cozy comfort and family feasting that just a hint of the scent evokes fall weather and holiday gatherings. Here we have compiled a set of recipes that honor this Proustian effect. These recipes either use pumpkin pie spice outright, or they use a combination of the individual spices that when employed are evocative of the beloved orange gourd.

But first, let's give a quick introduction to those found in pumpkin pie spice blend.

FALL SPICES in PUMPKIN PIE SPICE BLEND

1
Cinnamon
There are a few different species of cinnamon, but the ones known best in American kitchens are of the cassia variety. Cassia cinnamon is sweet with bit of a spicy bite. It is a favorite for dusting fall foods as both an aesthetic and aromatic treat.
2
Nutmeg
Despite its name and its somewhat nutty flavor, nutmeg is not a nut. It is a seed kernel. In the past, the aristocracy of France and England would carry a kernel, usually encased in a silver grater, for use at dinner parties. Nutmeg has notes of clove and citrus.
3
Allspice
This is another spice name that causes confusion. Allspice is a single spice and not a blend; it is a dried berry from an evergreen tree. Its flavor might have helped determine what it was called, since it truly does taste like a blend of cinnamon, cloves, ginger, and nutmeg.
4
Ginger root
Dried ginger root is pungent and spicy. Ginger snaps and gingerbread are both familiar foods that feature its warm but biting flavor. It even appears in popular beverages: ginger beer and ginger ale.
5
Cloves
Cloves are intensely aromatic, warm, and pungent. They can be found in sweet and savory dishes and help add complexity to many spice blends.
6
Mace
Mace is most likely the least familiar spice mentioned thus far. It is harvested from the same fruit as nutmeg as it is the membranous covering, or aril, of a nutmeg kernel. When dried, mace's flavor is a more subtle version of nutmeg, but with a set of sweet and slightly pungent notes.

Here are some pumpkin spiced recipes to help you capitalize on the best parts of the cooler weather.
Make Pumpkin Spice Sweet Treats Pumpkin pie is a favorite fall dessert, and pumpkin spice lattes have certainly cast pumpkin pie's flavor profile in a new role. As our yearning for this cozy taste of home increases we've developed new recipes that have made the pie's blend of spices a star. And so we've found another way to satisfy our cravings—pumpkin pie spice works well subbed into all kinds of traditional recipes.

What could be more autumnal than the smell of cinnamon-y fresh baked goods? Scones are a great way to indulge in all the magnificence of pumpkin pie spice without the sugar of an actual pumpkin pie. Scones are perfect for fancy brunches or for just pampering yourself while sipping tea and reading a book.

Because maybe you do want more sugar, this scone recipe also has instructions for a vanilla glaze or optional crystallized ginger inclusions. Drizzle the glazing for additional visual appeal and to add a bit more sweetness to the dish.

Maybe it's fall and all things pumpkin are appropriate, but maybe it's summer and the outdoors is melting in oppressive heat. As your mind casts itself over the pleasures of autumn and you are thinking how much you long for crisp breezes and crunchy leaves, consider making a batch of this pumpkin pie spice ice cream to indulge your wistfull wishes while still cooling off from the summer sun.

This ice cream recipe employs the French-style custard method for making ice cream. It requires an ice cream maker and some time to churn. That said, its rich creamness is worth the extra time and effort.

The thumbprint cookie is a sugar cookie dough classic. Featuring a moist and chewy base with shallow indents that can hold a variety of fillings, the thumbprint cookie is infinitely customizable. We've added a bit of luxury to this base recipe; it is modified with aromatic vanilla bean seeds for an extra sensory sumptuousness.

Not missing an opportunity to add employ a favorite fall flavor, we've developed a pumpkin pie spiced and whipped honey combination. Beware that after drizzling this mixture onto your cookies, you might end up licking the spoon.

Make Pumpkin Spice Drinks We can't ignore the obvious: lattes and coffee concoctions are where pumpkin pie spice got its newfound glory. Here are a few recipes that will help you add the flavor to your beverages, some of which can be made ahead of time. With these on hand, a pumpkin spice treat will never be far from your fingertips.

Elevate your Monday mood by having this pumpkin spice creamer ready to add to your morning coffee on the gloomiest of days. This recipe will take about ten minutes of your time, but your future self with thank you.

This blend of half-and-half, sugar, and spices also features actual pumpkin puree.

No matter how early in August Starbucks releases its pumpkin spice line, it never feels early enough. If this flavor has you bewitched and accessibility is elusive, make your own pumpkin spice cold brew at home. The time it takes is worth year-round access.

This recipe uses maple syrup instead of sugar, so it is a bit more caramel-flavored than the Starbucks version. Also, if you don't have a way to cold brew coffee, you could use iced coffee as a substitute.

Pumpkin spice syrup is another make-ahead idea. It can add a touch of fall to your ice creams, smoothies, milk steamers, etc. As back-to-school days approach consider drizzling it on morning oatmeal and you'll make the day a little more special for blurry-eyed littles.

This recipe uses both granulated sugar and light brown sugar to give the syrup a little more caramel flavor. Vanilla extract rounds out the pumpkin pie spice used and adds a mellow sweetness in taste and fragrance.

Make Pumpkin Spice Drinks with Alcohol Give your grown up drinks a touch of whimsy with the addition of pumpkin pie spice. It's not candy, but it's close. Your nose will smell pie, your mouth will taste sugar, and your belly will enjoy a warm glow — how very autumn.

The creaminess of this classic pairs well with pumpkin pie spice. Considering our relatively new, but very strong associations of pumpkin pie spice with coffee, this variation seems like a natural. The drink features Kahlúa, a coffee-flavored liqueur made with actual coffee.

Topping this drink with whipped cream can give your inner child a thrill, but the cocktail is not diminished in flavor or appearance with this step omitted.

On a hot day, the condensation on a copper mug of a Moscow mule is almost as enticing as the fizzy concoction inside. It promises cool refreshment and some relief from the heat. This is exactly what the drink was designed to do according to at least one version of this cocktail's origin stories. The lore goes that in the early 40s the owner of a vodka distillery, a barkeep who'd created his own ginger beer, and the Russian-born daughter and co-designer of a copper mug collaborated to bring America a new drink. The "where," "when," and even exact "who" of this event seems to be hard to pin down—but not the fact that the drink rose steadily in popularity and inspired numerous variations.

This variation elaborates on the initial formula and capitalizes on the holiday associations of the ginger in ginger beer. Adding pumpkin pie spice blend helps bend the balance of the drink even further in favor of fall flavor.

This martini variation is shaken, but we promise the effect will be stirring. Shaking will lend this drink the proper amount of chill. Furthermore, the opaque whipping cream and pumpkin puree it contains means it does not require the more delicate method of stirring, which is sometimes employed to keep a traditional martini clear and jewel-like in appearance.

For additional flair, you can rim the glass with sugar and pumpkin pie spice blend; float a pecan as a further nod to pie; serve with a cinnamon stick on the side; or do all three.